My Moral Philosophy

My Moral Philosophy

Intuitively, we understand that if we can get the same results with either violence or non-violence, then the method of non-violence is infinitely more moral. To clarify, here are some examples of goals and how they can be met with and without violence:

  1. Getting a girl -  I can kidnap one and trap her in a well Buffalo Bill style, OR I can make myself appealing, ask her out, and allow her to voluntarily choose to be with me.
  2. Getting a kid to do chores - I can threaten to hit him if he doesn't do it, OR I can negotiate or make a game out of it to help him want to do it.
  3. Bettering the education system - I can take money from people against their will and subsidize public schools, OR I can work for, create or support companies like Praxis, which make education cheaper and more efficient.

Notice that the peaceful solutions require more work and creativity. On the other hand, violence is an easy, one-size-fits-all type of tool. It simply doesn't require much critical thought, work or patience.

Do you want something done but you're too lazy, incompetent and/or sadistic? Well, have I got the perfect solution for you: violence.

I can't tell you how many times I've heard people say that corporal punishment is absolutely necessary for this or that when they haven't even read a single book on peaceful parenting. 

The lack of research is even more egregious when it comes to people advocating for government force. That's because people get their belief in government through social osmosis instead of through critical thought. Even people who don't care at all about politics are absolutely, 100% sure that society would collapse without government coercion. It's almost as if they were taught by schools run by governments. Oh, wait.

It really bothers me that most people argue for corporal punishment and institutionalized violence as if they've personally ruled out every voluntary option. It bothers me even more that those people are usually the same ones who claim to care about people. 

About 70% of the U.S. population still endorses corporal punishment and the love for government coercion is as popular as the love for hamburgers. Do you think all of those people thoroughly examined their options before reaching those conclusions? Especially when I consider how little critical thought is promoted in schools, I doubt it.  

The fact is, most people reach for the sword way too quickly. I attribute this to laziness, incompetency, and/or sadism. I mean, just think of the three violent scenarios I gave and see what applies with what. It's actually a fun thought experiment. 

Whatever the reason is, I don't think it's an excuse. If people support violent solutions when they didn't even look for voluntary alternatives, I think they are being immoral. So, here's my general rule that everyone who does not want to be immoral must follow: 

If you haven't properly searched for peaceful solutions, your default position should NOT be that a violent one is necessary. 

(Of course, this is provided that you have the time to assess your options - I'm not suggesting, if a crazy guy ran at you with a knife, that you stop and think of every course of action before shooting him)

Doing merely some research is not enough. To do this properly, I recommend that you thoroughly test all proposed peaceful solutions. I know, it sounds like hard work, but you should be happy to have a high tolerance before resorting to violence. If you don't have that then I'm afraid you may have a bad case of authoritarianism.

Notice how, with this moral rule, it is easy to not do the wrong thing. It is just as simple as not advocating for or committing violence when you don't know enough. You can literally do this in your sleep! 

If you're a person who has supported or committed violence without satisfying this rule, you probably want to demand that I show you a peaceful solution before you let go of your belief in the violent one. While I could probably point you to a non-violent alternative to some situations, the truth is that I shouldn't have to. 

That's because the burden of proof is not on me, but rather on the people that claim that the ONLY way to get something done is through force. It's not up to the girl to prove to me why I shouldn't kidnap her. If I belt a child to get him to do chores, it is not up to him to justify why I shouldn't have done it. The same goes with me demanding forced redistribution of wealth. I'm the aggressor, so why should the victims carry the burden? Sadly this simple truth of who should carry the burden of proof has been tragically ignored.

Okay, now that you know these things, there really is no excuse. Like I said, all you have to do is drop your support of violence until you do the proper research. That is, if you don't want to be immoral. Luckily for you, there are people out there that have devoted their whole lives to finding peaceful alternatives. Every resource imaginable is easily accessible to us by the power of the internet. So, go out there and explore. Once you let go of the limiting idea that violence is necessary, you might be surprised by all the possibilities. 

NBA > NFL

NBA > NFL

There are many reasons why I always liked basketball. One big reason is that it has a low barrier for getting involved: all you need is a ball and a hoop, plus you can play alone or with as many people as you want.

One less obvious, but I think more important, reason is because it cultivates individualism. Every player is empowered to change the course of a game. This power is not dictated by what position one plays. In football we clearly see that it is the quarterback who has the most power to affect the game. In this way, individual merit matters a lot less, because you can be the best kicker in the world and you will hardly get credit for a win compared to the quarterback. 

Basketball also cultivates individualism because it's a lot easier to identify each player along with his emotions. As an audience member, this lets you further appreciate the player as a person rather than as a pawn in a game. This is very different from covering him with so much gear and putting him far in the middle of a gigantic stadium, where it's hard to distinguish him from others let alone see what he is feeling. 

Also, I don't have the hard evidence to back it up right now, but it seems that the NFL is more strict with how the players can express themselves. How often do you see NFL players wearing ridiculous clothes compared to NBA players? 

To put it simply, it seems to me that the NBA is marketed a lot better than the NFL. They know individualism is what sells. 

So it will come to no surprise to me if there comes a day when the NBA surpasses the NFL as the most popular American sport. 

Hi

Hi

So It’s been about a year since I’ve set up this blog of mine and I’ve yet to post anything.

The main reason of why I’ve struggled to put anything on here is because I have severe anxiety. Basically I’m afraid to put my thoughts and feelings into the world and potentially being judged for them. There is a lot to say as to why I feel this way, which will have to be a topic for a future post.

So why do I want to publicly write about my thoughts and feelings if I am afraid of doing so?

Well, precisely because I don’t want to be afraid anymore. I want to finally feel free to express my true self (though first I have to do some digging to see who my true self is). I think confronting it in the form of a public blog is a great way to work towards that goal. Even if no one sees my writing, as a person with constant self-censorship in his system, this is a big step for me.

Besides that, there are so many benefits to writing a blog. Benefits which include:

  • Putting my thoughts out will allow people that think alike to find me, thus creating the kind of relationships I want to create. This might also weed out the kind of people I don’t want in my life.
  • Developing writing skills and creativity
  • Finding my voice / learning about myself
  • Documenting my progress in life
  • Building a good habit
  • Gaining confidence in myself

So obviously there are many benefits, but just for the purpose of analysis I’ll list my potential hindrances:

  • I could say the “wrong” thing and be crucified by the internet Justine Sacco style
  • Since I plan on being personal and honest, I will be more vulnerable
  • My beliefs will be out in the open and I may be ostracized by groups that dislike them, including potential employers

That’s all I can think of right now though I’m sure there are more.

Anyway, I understand that this is a double-edged sword. After thinking about this long and hard, I’m betting that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Besides, I think that privacy is dead in this age and this blog is at least a way to control my “image.”