My Favorite Podcasts of March 2019

I love podcasts. I often say they have educated me more than school ever did. The more time passes, the more this is true. The problem is that the more time passes, the more podcasts there are, and the more podcasts there are, the harder it is to choose what to listen to. That's why I started publicly documenting all the podcasts I listen to in the hope of helping people make more informed decisions. (see table above)

I wish everyone did the same. In an age where information is basically unlimited, we need more curators! Well as they say, be the change you want to see in the world.

I'm already documenting the podcasts I listen to, but I think I'm going to take it a step further and post about my favorite listens at the end of each month. Because why not make it easier for you?


On March, I listened to 72 episodes from 45 different podcasts. This added up to 63 hours worth. (Though I listen to a lot of them at 2x speed, or more)

Here are my 5 favorite episodes in no particular order:

Mike Solana: Problems inventing the future, Problem Sighted

Mike (@micsolana) is the vice president of Founders Fund, a venture capital firm founded by Peter Thiel. This was my first time hearing about Mike. Now I'm a fan, and not just because he's a libertarian. 

This episode showcases a view of the future from the perspective of a story teller.  And let me tell you, it looks awesome.

He argues that there's a disconnect between how technology is perceived and how great the possibilities are. He challenges the all too common, pessimistic view of our future. I found this refreshing.  

The part that stuck with me the most was Mike's argument that wealth grows. He brought up the fact that there are thousands of billionaires when, not too long ago, there was only one. (I just looked it up. There's 2,208!) And this has not resulted in us having less wealth. In fact, we have more.

Eric Weinstein: Revolutionary Ideas in Science, Math, and Society, Artificial Intelligence

Seemingly in response to the previous podcast, this conversation between Lex Fridman (@lexfridman) and Eric Weinstein (@EricRWeinstein) has a more pessimistic take on technology (particularly AI). Eric expresses a strong concern about AI. He argues that even if things seem to be going fine, the bad things are still there, only in the form of potential energy. That idea really grabbed me.

Despite the gloominess, I think this episode has best-of-the-year potential. It was full of interesting ideas and it was challenging. I think Lex and Eric make a great duo — I would love to see them together again. Maybe they should even start their own podcast!

This episode touches on way more topics than AI — it also covers capitalism, Kung Fu Panda, academics, 14 dimensional observerse (whatever the hell that is) and more. If you're looking for an intellectual rollercoaster, then this it. But first, I should warn you it can get pretty mind-bending. Basically, you must be this smart to ride 👉 160 IQ.

Daniel Kahneman: The Map of Misunderstanding, Making Sense With Sam Harris

This podcast is very much like the one above — it presents interesting after interesting ideas. Ideas that are so unique and yet so simple in retrospect (my favorite kind!). This is my first time ever hearing about Daniel Kahneman. How that's possible I do not know. 

In this episode I learned that some of the most celebrated studies are riddled with bias, and therefore not replicable. "The more surprising a result is the less likely it is correct."

I also learned that our intuition betrays us when making moral decisions. For example, showing a picture of a poor girl in need makes us give more than if we were shown a picture of the same girl and her brother. And the amount we give drops drastically when we are shown many more kids in need. This is a very interesting revelation, which I think explains why there is moral panic about (in my opinion) small things and indifference towards (imo) big things. 

This podcast is 2 hours long, so you can be sure to hear many more interesting ideas. 

Dave Gerhardt: Legendary Marketing Lightning Strike, Follow Your Different

This podcast introduced me to three big things which I'm now very interested in: Dave Gerhardt and David Cancel (my new favorite people to learn from), category design, and conversational marketing (aka chatbots).

This podcast gave me a new understanding on marketing: now that companies pretty much have the same technology, it's the relationship between you and your customers that makes you stand out.

Ever since hearing this episode, I've gone down a rabbit hole of chatbots and conversational marketing. At this point, I'm fully sold that this is the future of marketing and I'm excited to learn more. 

It's also worth mentioning that I really like the chemistry between Dave and the host, Christopher Lochhead

If you like this episode, you should listen to the one with David Cancel too.

Mike Solana: How Capitalism Will Get Us to Mars and Beyond, Reason Podcast

After listening to Solana for the first time on the Problems Sighted podcast, I knew I wanted to hear more. So I did. 

Even though it's a repeated guest, I feel the need to include this episode on the list because it includes the story of how he got to meet and work for Peter Thiel. It was a cool story of right place, right time. Of course, this is not to take away from his proactive past that got him there in the first place.

In this episode, I learned a bit about Thiel's peculiar personality. I loved it.

It also includes an awesome rant about capitalism vs socialism at the end. 

Because you get to know more about Mike as a person, I recommend you listen to this one before the other one.


So thats the best of the month according to me. What about you? Let me know. I really love getting recommendations. You can reach me through my Twitter or however else you see fit.

About

Hello, I'm Erick. I like to write about philosophy, self-development, running, unschooling, podcasts, software tools and digital marketing.