Breaking Smart Notes # 3

Name of Essay: Towards a Mass Flourishing

These essays are not about answering 'what' or 'when' — they are about explaining 'how'

  • instead of trying to predict the future, and therefore limiting ourselves, we need to have a hacker ethos.
    • trying to predict the future is of a "pastoral mindset." It causes us to be attached to a 'what' and 'when' which is costly if we're wrong.
    • Inventing the future is easier than predicting it.

Small teams are better than corporations. "Small enough to be fed by two pizzas."

  • Because it's more flexible. More opportunity for experimentation.
  • Long term, strict and expensive scripts (like school) will have a diminishing role in shaping the future.

There are four characteristics of how the future will emerge:

  1. As collaboration technologies improve, the innovative culture from Silicon Valley will spread.
  2. It will unfold through small two pizza groups who will have very large impacts. 
  3. Gradual improvement of well-being and quality of life will increase across the world.
    • It won't be smooth but the overall trend will be upwards.
  4. Rapid decline in the cost of solutions to problems. From everything to education and healthcare. 

This positive incline can can be called "slouching utopia": a condition of gradual, increasing quality of life available, at gradually declining cost, to a gradually expanding portion of the global population. 

The future of work

People will engage in satisfying new needs in ways that can't be anticipated. 

While we can't predict exactly what the work will be the future, we can say that it will "take on an experimental, trial-and-error character." 

  • work will be about getting constant feedback and improvement. Constant learning. (hacker ethos)

Work will be challenging and therefore fulfilling. The unchallenging and predictable work will be taken by machines. 

  • That vision is called 'mass flourishing', coined by Edmund Phelps.

We are "slouching towards a consumer and producer utopia"

That may sound overly dramatic but — when you take into consideration how language and money has changed humanity, and realize that software is even more powerful than those — it is not so crazy to think that. 

About

Hello, I'm Erick. I like to write about philosophy, self-development, running, unschooling, podcasts, software tools and digital marketing.